Moonlight

The first movement (Adagio sostenuto) of the Piano Sonata No. 14 in C Sharp Major, Opus 27, No. 2 (“Moonlight Sonata”) by Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827), is a very well-known piece of solo piano music. Some might even say it’s overplayed. Not me. Beethoven wrote the sonata in 1801 and dedicated it to a studentContinue reading “Moonlight”

Verdigris

Sometimes when you’re not at your best, overtired, or simply overwhelmed by the world, it’s good to have someone that you can trust and count on to speak for you. Tonight I feel that way, and not because something terrible happened. Quite the contrary: I received my first dose of a vaccine today. It wasContinue reading “Verdigris”

Les Enfants Terribles, VI: Terrible Interlude

That’s quite a title, isn’t it? I promise, the piece is far from terrible… Today, I’m featuring a relatively new release I found today on the Deutsche Grammophon YouTube channel, played by the French piano duo Katia and Marielle Labèque. “Terrible Interlude” comes from an 11-part suite for piano duet, Les Enfants Terribles. The workContinue reading “Les Enfants Terribles, VI: Terrible Interlude”

Eugene Onegin, Op. 24, TH 5: “Kuda, kuda, kuda vi udalilis”

Today is the first time in a while that I’ve featured an operatic piece on a “Classical Sunday”; I thought it was about time! I noticed an aria in my YouTube feed, “Kuda, kuda, kuda vi udalilis” (“Where, where, where did you go?”) from the opera Eugene Onegin, Op. 24 by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840-1893).Continue reading “Eugene Onegin, Op. 24, TH 5: “Kuda, kuda, kuda vi udalilis””

Ballade No. 1 in G Minor, Op. 23

Happy World Piano Day! Today, I saw a post by the record label Deutsche Grammophon on their YouTube channel, celebrating the day. I’ve already featured a couple of their pianists, so I thought I would look for another soloist’s performance in the suggested videos sidebar. I found one of Russian-German pianist Olga Scheps playing theContinue reading “Ballade No. 1 in G Minor, Op. 23”

Carry

A few weekends ago, I browsed the always-reliable Deutsche Grammophon YouTube channel, looking for interesting examples of classical music for Classical Sunday. At that time, I found an orchestral rendition of the Eno/Roedelius/Moebius electronic-rock piece, “By This River.” I also found a piece by alternative rock singer-songwriter Tori Amos (whose music I have featured twiceContinue reading “Carry”

Nocturne in F-Sharp Major, Op. 15 No. 2

The Polish composer Frédéric Chopin (1810-1849) wrote 21 nocturnes. The three that make up his Opus 15 were written between 1830 and 1833, and he wrote “Nocturne in F-Sharp Major, Op. 15, No. 2” in 1832. The nocturne is made up of three sections. The first is slow and intricate (larghetto), followed by a doppioContinue reading “Nocturne in F-Sharp Major, Op. 15 No. 2”

By This River

Today’s selection is the classical reimagining of a piece from Before and After Science, the fifth studio album by Brian Eno, released in 1977. The album was Eno’s final foray into rock music before pioneering and diving headlong into the ambient music genre, a place where he still lives and works. However, he has returnedContinue reading “By This River”

Les Contes d’Hoffmann: Belle nuit, ô nuit d’amour (Barcarolle)

Today, I was surfing around the web, looking for a classical music piece to share. I found a long operatic aria, but it was a bit too over the top for my taste. I then want back to my old standby for classical music, Deutsche Grammophon. Their YouTube channel is so tidy and organized, andContinue reading “Les Contes d’Hoffmann: Belle nuit, ô nuit d’amour (Barcarolle)”

Cinnabar

This morning during a chat with a friend from Atlantic Canada, we both recalled fun times we’d had at beaches in our respective provinces this past summer. That has caused me to think about vacation travel. Today, the stairs and sidewalks outside the house were all covered with slick ice. It would be a greatContinue reading “Cinnabar”

Vermillion

I awoke sometime in the middle of the night last night with the worst, most vivid and horrifying nightmare I’ve had. And it’s stuck with me all day. To ease the memory of that, I’m sliding into an ambient track from, you guessed it, Brian and Roger Eno’s 2020 collaboration, Mixing Colours. Please also checkContinue reading “Vermillion”

Organ Sonata No.4, BWV 528, II: Andante [Adagio] (Transcription for Piano)

On Sundays, I often cruise around the Deutsche Grammophon YouTube channel. It’s a label I was reasonably familiar with when I was buying a lot of records and even CDs in the 1970s and 80s. The channel has many superb pieces that I’ve posted about, like Rufus Wainwright’s “A Woman’s Face (Sonnet 20)” and someContinue reading “Organ Sonata No.4, BWV 528, II: Andante [Adagio] (Transcription for Piano)”

Wintergreen

Today there’s been light, off-and-on snowfall and some blustery winds. A good day to hang about indoors and maybe do a virtual bike ride on the trainer. Instead, after the usual morning routines dictated by Perry Como the cat, then a Zoom meditation and a meeting, then lunch, I had a snooze while my sweetyContinue reading “Wintergreen”

Flight from the City

In case you’re following here and wondering… no, today’s post isn’t a continuation of the holiday theme I mentioned yesterday. Browsing the Deutsche Grammophon record label’s YouTube channel this morning, I came across a lovely piano and string ensemble piece. “Flight from the City” is the opening track from Orphée, the tenth and final solo album byContinue reading “Flight from the City”

Concerto For Piano and Orchestra No. 2 in F Minor, Op.21, II: Larghetto

Many have probably heard piano works by Polish composer and pianist Frédéric Chopin (1810-1849, born Fryderyk Franciszek Chopin), without even knowing the music is by him. For example, the opening chords of the third movement of his Piano Sonata No. 2, known as the “Funeral March,” are often used as music to create a senseContinue reading “Concerto For Piano and Orchestra No. 2 in F Minor, Op.21, II: Larghetto”

Pour le Piano, II: Sarabande

A few weeks ago, when I was looking for a particular classical piece, I stumbled upon this piano piece by Claude Debussy (1862-1918), and it’s remained with me since. The YouTube notes for the music say, “Watch Rafał Blechacz play Debussy’s “Sarabande” from his new DG recording featuring piano works by (Karol) Szymanowski and Debussy.Continue reading “Pour le Piano, II: Sarabande”

Italian Concerto in F Major, BWV 971, II: Andante

Years ago, soon after her 1985 debut, I saw Canadian pianist Angela Hewitt with the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra at the Centennial Concert Hall. Her playing was divine. I don’t remember which pieces were on the concert playbill, but I do recall being mesmerized by the graceful movement as her hands moved over the keyboard. It’sContinue reading “Italian Concerto in F Major, BWV 971, II: Andante”

Ultramarine

Today, I’m feeling a little low on energy. I’ve been cycling in the high heat and humidity, so am taking a couple of days off. It also has been an emotional day, attending the COVID-socially-distanced, outdoor interment service for our dear friend’s mother; she was a delightful, vibrant and kind soul who was taken tooContinue reading “Ultramarine”

Mass in C Minor, K. 427, Gloria: Qui Tollis

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s “Grosse Messe” or “Great Mass” was a prominent part of the soundtrack for the 1988 miniseries on England’s Channel Four, A Very British Coup. The three-episode program starred the iconic (and now late) British actor Ray McAnally as the Labour Party leader, and member of Parliament for a northern England constituency suddenlyContinue reading “Mass in C Minor, K. 427, Gloria: Qui Tollis”

Blonde

After a busy but enjoyable few days hosting the visitors who put on our house concert, and today with the dreaded and archaic change to Daylight Savings Time, it feels like a good day for a chill piece of music. (I find “chill” is an odd way to describe something intended to promote relaxation andContinue reading “Blonde”