Piano Concerto No. 5 in E Flat Major, Op. 73: II. Adagio un poco moto

If you’ve been following this blog for a while, you’ll notice I feature a piece of classical music each Sunday. The practice developed from a suggestion one of my brothers made a couple of years ago to feature classical pieces more often. And if you’ve really been watching and listening, you’ll know I’m partial toContinue reading “Piano Concerto No. 5 in E Flat Major, Op. 73: II. Adagio un poco moto”

Partita for Violin Solo No. 1 in B Minor, BWV 1002, IV: Double (Presto)

This morning, we awoke to heavily drifted-in snow from a second blizzard this week. While my sweety was out walking this afternoon she heard from a friend that, so far this month, we have had the sixth-heaviest accumulation of snow since the late 1890s! Overall, it has been a very cold and very snowy winter.Continue reading “Partita for Violin Solo No. 1 in B Minor, BWV 1002, IV: Double (Presto)”

Ruckert-Lieder, III: Ich bin der Welt abhanden gekommen

Today I’m sharing the third in a set of five songs Austro-Bohemian Romantic composer and conductor Gustav Mahler (1860-1911) wrote in 1901-1902. Mahler’s collection is a setting of poems by the German professor, translator and Romantic poet Friedrich Ruckert (1788-1866). The first four pieces in the set were premiered in 1905, with Mahler conducting theContinue reading “Ruckert-Lieder, III: Ich bin der Welt abhanden gekommen”

The Turning Year

This morning, while contemplating what piece of music to share on what I like to refer to as Classical Sunday, I sampled a few violin pieces on Apple Music. Then I shuffled over to YouTube where, serendipitously, its suggestions served up a new work by British ambient music composer and musician Roger Eno. Debuted onContinue reading “The Turning Year”

Violin Concerto No. 2 in F, Op. 8/3, RV 293, “Autumn,” II: Adagio molto

Today in my country, it is Thanksgiving Sunday, during a long holiday weekend observed without question in the same way for many generations. In recent years, and particularly this year, it seems that is changing. As a nation, Canada has been forced to reckon with a story of colonialism and the devastating consequences of aContinue reading “Violin Concerto No. 2 in F, Op. 8/3, RV 293, “Autumn,” II: Adagio molto”

Vesperae solennes de confessore in C, K 339, V: Laudate Dominum omnes gentes (Psalms 116/117)

Today for Classical Sunday, I’m featuring an old family favourite soprano soloist, Kiri Te Kanawa. One of my favourite pieces in the New Zealand soprano’s repertoire is the fifth movement of the Vesperae solennes de confessore in C, by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791). The Laudate Dominum omnes gentes is a setting of the two-verse PsalmContinue reading “Vesperae solennes de confessore in C, K 339, V: Laudate Dominum omnes gentes (Psalms 116/117)”

Spiegel im Spiegel

This summer, while I wasn’t blogging, I acted on the advice one of my brothers gave when I told him about my planned break. He suggested I take notes of things and music that resonated with me. He and I share a love for the idea of those happenings in life considered “chance,” which weContinue reading “Spiegel im Spiegel”

Du bist die Ruh, D. 776; Op. 59, No. 3

Winding my way down an internet rabbit hole this afternoon, I found a beautiful piece by Austrian composer Franz Schubert (1797-1828), “Du bist die Ruh” (“You are repose,” or “You are rest and peace”). Schubert wrote music, for solo voice and piano, to four poems by German poet Friedrich Rückert (1788-1866). Today’s selection is theContinue reading “Du bist die Ruh, D. 776; Op. 59, No. 3”

Ballade No. 1 in G Minor, Op. 23

Happy World Piano Day! Today, I saw a post by the record label Deutsche Grammophon on their YouTube channel, celebrating the day. I’ve already featured a couple of their pianists, so I thought I would look for another soloist’s performance in the suggested videos sidebar. I found one of Russian-German pianist Olga Scheps playing theContinue reading “Ballade No. 1 in G Minor, Op. 23”

13 Minutes to the Moon (Theme Music)

On Friday, when sharing Cilla Black’s “Work Is a Four-Letter Word,” I told you a little about Amy Lamé’s program on BBC 6 Music. After finishing her February 28 program installment, I started looking at other program subscriptions on the BBC Sounds app. There I saw links to 13 Minutes to the Moon, a podcastContinue reading “13 Minutes to the Moon (Theme Music)”

Cinderella, Op. 87, Act I: No. 1, Introduction (Andante Dolce)

Many years ago, one of my brothers and I and our partners were together a lot to watch movies and listen to classical music long-play records (it was a long time ago, so we most likely were watching VHS tapes!). He quizzed, coached and helped me learn who composers were through their different styles andContinue reading “Cinderella, Op. 87, Act I: No. 1, Introduction (Andante Dolce)”

Les Contes d’Hoffmann: Belle nuit, ô nuit d’amour (Barcarolle)

Today, I was surfing around the web, looking for a classical music piece to share. I found a long operatic aria, but it was a bit too over the top for my taste. I then want back to my old standby for classical music, Deutsche Grammophon. Their YouTube channel is so tidy and organized, andContinue reading “Les Contes d’Hoffmann: Belle nuit, ô nuit d’amour (Barcarolle)”

The NeverEnding Story

A few days ago, I came upon a song that made me think of some studies I did back in the 1990s. I’ve mentioned before here that from 1993 to 1996, I was at home full-time caring for my sons as that was the arrangement that best suited our family at the time. I supplementedContinue reading “The NeverEnding Story”

Piano Concerto No. 23, K. 488, II: Adagio

It was a long day of online Christmas shopping yesterday. No hassles with crowds and parking, but many different websites, all with very different, sometimes confusing online experiences and slow responses from my computer, the internet, and or websites; it was good to complete all that, hours later. Then I relaxed, listening to an archivedContinue reading “Piano Concerto No. 23, K. 488, II: Adagio”

The Very Thought of You

I haven’t yet listened to last weekend’s installment of Guy Garvey’s Finest Hour, “Nick Drake — Featured Artist,” but looked over the tracklist today, and it is inviting and engaging as usual. I look forward to spending some time with it soon, thanks to the BBC Sounds app. One of the songs on Garvey’s listContinue reading “The Very Thought of You”

Symphony No. 7 in A Major, Opus 92, II: Allegretto

The second movement (Allegretto) of Symphony No. 7 by the German composer Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827), is a favourite of mine. The movement combines dramatic, sombre and calming melodies in a lyrical landscape of symphonic instruments. When listening to it, I prefer to hear it as a standalone piece as I find the calmness atContinue reading “Symphony No. 7 in A Major, Opus 92, II: Allegretto”

Concerto For Piano and Orchestra No. 2 in F Minor, Op.21, II: Larghetto

Many have probably heard piano works by Polish composer and pianist Frédéric Chopin (1810-1849, born Fryderyk Franciszek Chopin), without even knowing the music is by him. For example, the opening chords of the third movement of his Piano Sonata No. 2, known as the “Funeral March,” are often used as music to create a senseContinue reading “Concerto For Piano and Orchestra No. 2 in F Minor, Op.21, II: Larghetto”

Violin Concerto No. 2, “Summer”

Antonio Vivaldi composed his best-known works, four violin concerti that form The Four Seasons, around 1716 or 1717. They were the first four concerti of 12 in his Opus number 8, Cimento dell’ Armonia e dell’ Inventione (The Contest Between Harmony and Invention).  Each concerto of the four is written in three movements, and the soundsContinue reading “Violin Concerto No. 2, “Summer””